Tag Archives: Uniface

Elongate from Key West Ripleys Believe It Or Not Museum

This elongated nickel is from the Ripley’s Believe It Or Not Museum in Key West, Florida.

On the obverse, it shows a Padaung woman with rings stretching her neck. Kinda ironic, on an elongated coin, right? Robert Riple’ys signature is at the 12:00 on the tip of the long side of the coin. The bottom of the coin says “Key West”.

Elongated Nickel from Ripleys Believe It Or Not Key West Museum Obverse

Elongated Nickel from Ripleys Believe It Or Not Key West Museum Obverse

The reverse is plain, with very little trace of the original coin (a nickel or a quarter).

Elongated Nickel from Ripleys Believe It Or Not Key West Museum Reverse

Elongated Nickel from Ripleys Believe It Or Not Key West Museum Reverse

Source: A penny pressing machine at the Key West Odditorium.

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: Jefferson nickel (circa 2000)

Other details: The long-necked Paduang women are famed for their giraffe necks. They achieve this effect by putting bronze rings around their necks at a young age and gradually adding more to stretch out their necks. Unfortunately, they can’t take the rings off because their necks are too weak to support the weight of their heads.

The tradition is dying off because young Padaung women don’t want to be treated like tourist attractions.

Estimated Value: $0.55

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die in a rolling mill. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. The rolling mills often have designs on just one side, although 2 sided designs are fairly common. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Playing Cards in Las Vegas).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity.

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San Antonio Riverwalk Elongated Penny

This elongated penny shows a pathway over the San Antonio River with a tour boat chugging along underneath. It is pressed onto a penny, and the design takes up about 75% of the surface.

Elongated Penny with San Antonio Riverwalk on the Obverse

Elongated Penny with San Antonio Riverwalk on the Obverse

Elongated Penny with San Antonio Riverwalk Reverse

Elongated Penny with San Antonio Riverwalk Reverse

Source: A penny press machine along the San Antonio riverwalk in Texas c. 2006. The River Walk is a touristy area with lots of TexMex restaurants, ice cream shops, and bars.

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: post 1982 Lincoln cent

Other details: This elongate is on a post 1982 penny, which means that it has a high zinc content. Crushing the Lincoln cent exposed the zinc, which has lead to some minor corrosion.

Estimated Value: $0.51

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die in a rolling mill. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. The rolling mills often have designs on just one side, although 2 sided designs are fairly common. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Playing Cards in Las Vegas).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity.

Missouri Tax Token – 1 Mill on Paper

This tax token is in remarkably good shape for a paper token. I’d grade it VF30 – EF40.

The obverse has a blue-green ring around the state seal of Missouri (also printed in aqua). Thee legend around the ring is printed in black and reads “Missouri Sales Tax Receipt”. Inside the ring is the legend “Retailers One 1 Mill”. The word one and the number are interwoven so that the N is astride the numeral.

The reverse is blank.

Tax Token from Missouri : One Mill on Paper Obverse
Tax Token from Missouri : One Mill on Paper Obverse
Tax Token from Missouri : One Mill on Paper Reverse
Tax Token from Missouri : One Mill on Paper Reverse

Date: circa 1940

State of Issue: Missouri

Mintage: unknown (but fairly large)

Composition: Paper

Size: 38 mm

Weight: unknown

Other details: This token is also available in a 2-sided version, although I don’t own one. The reverse on that reads “This receipt shows that you are helping to pay for old age pensions, support public schools, care of poor insane and tubercular patients in state hospitals and relief of needy unemployed in the state of Missouri.”

Estimated Value: $2-5

Elongated Penny with Navy Pier in Chicago

This elongated penny is well centered and has an unusual round logo within the crenulated border.

On the obverse is a representation of the Navy Pier building in Chicago, Illinois, surrounded by a circular border. The border looks a little bit like a life buoy (aka a life ring or round float) and encloses the legend “Navy Pier * Chicago”.

Elongated Penny from the Chicago Navy Pier Obverse

Elongated Penny from the Chicago Navy Pier Obverse

Elongated Penny from the Chicago Navy Pier Reverse

Elongated Penny from the Chicago Navy Pier Reverse

Source: Chicago, Illinois, at the Navy Pier in the spring of 2008.

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: Lincoln cent (date and composition unknown)

Other details: I picked this up while in Chicago to take the State Department Written Exam for Foreign Service Officers. They only had the test in Washington DC, Chicago, Seattle, Atlanta, Boston, LA, and New York City that year (if memory serves) and did not pay travel expenses. I guess they didn’t want anyone from the American Southwest applying.

Estimated Value: $0.51

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die in a rolling mill. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. The rolling mills often have designs on just one side, although 2 sided designs are fairly common. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Playing Cards in Las Vegas).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity.

Pressed Penny from Las Vegas with a Royal Flush

This squashed penny has a well centered uniface pattern and clearly shows the host coin on the reverse.

On the obverse, there’s a royal flush in hearts, with the legend “Las Vegas Nevada”. I’ve only had a royal flush once in my life without the use of wildcards, and it sadly didn’t happen on my Vegas trip.

Elongated Penny from Las Vegas with a Royal Flush Obverse

Elongated Penny from Las Vegas with a Royal Flush Obverse

Elongated Penny from Las Vegas with a Royal Flush Reverse

Elongated Penny from Las Vegas with a Royal Flush Reverse

Source: McCarran Airport in Las Vegas

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: 2000 Lincoln cent (pattern and date visible on reverse)

Other details: This elongate is on a post 1982 penny, which means that it has a high zinc content. Crushing the Lincoln cent exposed the zinc, which has lead to some minor corrosion.

Estimated Value: $0.51

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die in a rolling mill. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. The rolling mills often have designs on just one side, although 2 sided designs are fairly common. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Watching Wildlife in Austin).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity. For more information, check out The Elongate Collectors organization.

Elongated Penny from the Austin Nature & Science Museum

This elongate has minor corrosion, and very little of the host coin is visible on the reverse.

The pattern is uniface – the obverse shows a frog crawling up a wall, and the legend reads “Austin Nature and Science Center”.

Elongated Penny from the Austin Nature & Science Museum Obverse

Elongated Penny from the Austin Nature & Science Museum Obverse

Elongated Penny from the Austin Nature & Science Museum Reverse

Elongated Penny from the Austin Nature & Science Museum Reverse

Source: Austin, Texas at the Heard Nature Center

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: post 1982 Lincoln cent

Other details: This elongate is on a post 1982 penny, which means that it has a high zinc content. Crushing the Lincoln cent exposed the zinc, which has lead to some minor corrosion.

Estimated Value: $0.51

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Playing Cards in Las Vegas).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity.