Tag Archives: Penny

1964 Proof Cent slabbed PF68 * RD

This penny is a proof, slabbed in an NGC holder. It has a beautiful red sheen and a highly reflective surface that captures the light, softens it, and then bounces it back like a sun on the horizon. It’s a penny, so maybe I’m getting a bit carried away there.

1968 US Penny PF68 Obverse

1964 US Penny PF68 Obverse

The obverse shows President Abraham Lincoln in profile to the right. The legend “In god we trust” is written in raised letters from 10:00 to 2:00. The motto “Liberty” is to the left of Lincoln, in line with the back of his neck and his beard. The date is to the right of Lincoln’s bowtie and the mint mark (when present) is under the date.

1968 US Penny PF68 Reverse

1964 US Penny PF68 Reverse

The reverse shows the Lincoln Memorial under the country of origin “United States of America” written from 6:00 to 3:00 The legend “E Pluribus Unum” is written above the monument but below the inscription (that is Latin for “Out of many, one”). The denomination “One Cent” is written from 8:00 to 4:00.

Date: 1964

Mint Mark: n/a (Philadelphia)

Mintage: 03,950,762 (0.1489% of the 2,652,525,762 minted that year)

Country of origin: United States

Composition: 95% copper, 5% tin & zinc

Size: 19 mm

Weight: 3.11 grams (0.1097 oz)

Other details: Due to hoarding issues caused by the switch from silver to clad coinage, the minting of proof pennies was suspended from 1965 to 1967.

Slabbed 1968 Proof Cent in PF68

Slabbed 1968 Proof Cent in PF68

Slabbed 1968 Proof Cent in PF68 Reverse

Slabbed 1968 Proof Cent in PF68 Reverse

Estimated Value: $1-2 (although the slabbing does add another $4 or more, IMO)

1943 S Steel Penny, Double Die Reverse, US Steelie Cent

This steel cent is slabbed in an ANACS holder and graded MS61. I note some areas of corrosion on the obverse at 1:00 and on the reverse at 2:00, 4:00, and 5:30. The grade seems a bit higher than I would give this coin, but the zinc coating was highly susceptible to tarnish & this coin has beautiful, reflective surfaces that come out quite harshly in my photographs.

The obverse shows President Abraham Lincoln in profile to the right. The legend “In god we trust” is written in raised letters from 10:00 to 2:00. The motto “Liberty” is to the left of Lincoln, in line with the back of his neck and his beard. The date is to the right of Lincoln’s bowtie and the mint mark (when present) is under the date.

US Steel Cent - 1943 S Obverse

US Steel Cent - 1943 S Obverse

The reverse shows two sheaves of wheat on either side of the denomination and country of origin “ONE / CENT / United States of America”. The legend¬† “E Pluribus Unum” is written from 10:00 to 2:00 (Latin for “Out of many, one”).

US Steel Cent - 1943 S Reverse

US Steel Cent - 1943 S Reverse

Date: 1943

Mint Mark: S (San Francisco)

Mintage: 191,550,000 (17.51% of the total minted that year & for also 17.51% minted of this type – there were so few 1944 or other dated specimens that it doesn’t affect the percentages)

Country of origin: United States

Composition: Steel coated with Zinc (approximately 90% steel)

Size: 19 mm

Weight: 2.70 grams (0.095 oz)

Other details: 1943 was the only year that ‘steelies’ (aka Type II Wheat Pennies) were minted. Due to wartime rationing, the mint was asked to find an alternative to copper for the small cent. Switching to steel and zinc saved approximately 113,996,497 troy ounces of copper (~9.5 million troy pounds): that’s a lot of shell casings and electrical wires.

At the time, steel pennies were not very popular. They were easy to mistake for dimes, and they tarnished quickly. When exposed to salt water, the surface of the coin disappeared under a white powdery coating of oxidation. The coins were also very tough on mint machinery (since steel is much harder to press than copper) – they wore out dies very quickly, which increased their production cost and also created many error varieties from cracked or unevenly worn dies.

1943 Slabbed Steel Cent Obverse

1943 Slabbed Steel Cent Obverse

This penny is a minor error variety; a Double Die Reverse (DDR). There is minor doubling on the reverse, most notable around the legend.

 

1943 Slabbed Steel Cent Reverse

1943 Slabbed Steel Cent Reverse

There are about forty 1943 lincoln cents that were accidentally struck on copper planchets. These coins are very rare, but they are also heavily counterfeited. A steel cent that has been dipped to look like copper is easy to detect – simply check to see if it is magnetic (steel is, copper isn’t).

Estimated Value: $10-20

Clown Penny Token from Victorian England

This undated coin is a bit of a conundrum to me. It is in fine to very fine shape – I’ll grade it VF20.

One side of the token shows the legend “Clown” and the denomination “1 D“. An underlined d was commonly used as shorthand for the word penny in England and some of the British colonies in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Victorian England Clown Penny Reverse

Victorian England Clown Penny Reverse

This is confirmed by the other side of the coin, which reads only “One Penny”. That’s got to be one of the most boring reverses I’ve ever seen on a coin.

Victorian England Clown Penny Obverse

Victorian England Clown Penny Obverse

Identification code: unknown

Date: Approximately 1900? There was a coin shortage from the 1790’s to about 1870, but pennies at that time were much larger than this coin.

Mint Mark: n/a

Mintage: unknown (but I have not seen any coin like this, so presumably few were minted)

Country of origin: unknown

Composition: Brass?

Size: 18 mm

Weight: unknown

Other details: Did you know that the origins of the word “penny” are pretty murky? The word “penniless” dates to at least the14th century, which means that pennies must have been in use before that.

The use of an underlined D (ie; d) to indicate a penny has been found on ledger books from the 17th century, and it may date back to the Roman Denarius coin.

Estimated Value: unknown (I paid approximately $2 for this piece as part of a lot)

1904 Straits Settlement 1 Cent Coin

This coin is pretty beat up, I think it’s been polished. I’d grade it as Good 4, or maybe VG8.

The obverse shows British King Edward the Seventh in full regalia facing to the right. The legend reads “Edward VII * King & Emperor”. The king is a rather pleasant looking fellow, shown with a heavy crown and bushy mustache.

1904 Straits Settlement 1 Cent Penny Obverse

1904 Straits Settlement 1 Cent Penny Obverse

The reverse has the number 1 in a ring, with the legend “Straits Settlement * 1 Cent 1904”. It’s pretty plain and to the point.

1904 Straits Settlement 1 Cent Penny Reverse

1904 Straits Settlement 1 Cent Penny Reverse

Identification code: Straits Settlement KM-19 (1903-1908)

Date: 1904

Mint Mark: n/a

Mintage: 6,647,444 (click here for more mintage numbers in the series)

Country of origin: England

Composition: Bronze

Size: 29 mm

Weight: 9.3 grams

Other details: The Straits Settlement was a British colony from 1826 to 1945. It included Malacca, Penang (aka Prince of Wales Island), Labuan, and Singapore. Except for Singapore, most of its territory was incorporated into Malaysia.

In 1904 (the year this was minted, coincidentally), the Governor Sir John Anderson outlawed the use of coins from other countries within the Straits Settlement. He issued a three page special issue of the Straits Settlements Government Gazette on 24 Aug. 1904. It proclaimed “From 31 Aug. 1904, British, Mexican and Hong Kong Dollars will cease to be legal tender and will be replaced by the newly introduced Straits Settlements Dollar.”

Check out this site for many more pictures of Straits Settlement coins.

Estimated Value: $1-3 in this lousy condition.

1853 British Penny from the United Kingdom

This coin is in great shape – even though the scan doesn’t show it very well, there are traces of red mint luster in the fields.

On the obverse, there’s a young portrait of Queen Victoria facing to the left. The legend reads “Victoria Dei Gratia”.

On the reverse, the allegorical figure Brittania is shown holding a trident while sitting against a shield with the Saint George Cross on it. Below her, a long stemmed rose lays on its side. The legend reads “Brittania : Reg Fid : DEF :”.

1853 United Kingdom Penny Obverse

1853 United Kingdom Penny Obverse

1853 United Kingdom Penny Reverse

1853 United Kingdom Penny Reverse

Identification code: Great Britain KM-739

Date: 1853

Mint Mark: n/a – but (I think) this is a Type C date

Mintage: unknown (but fairly large)

Country of origin: England

Composition: Copper

Size: 34 mm

Weight: 18.8 grams

Other details: There were several varieties and types of errors that occur at the queen’s pony tail. This coin seems to be a Tie ribbon (Type3). I’ll try to post better pictures once I get the hang of photographing through a loupe.

As for identified varieties, this coin has the following going on. It has an ornamental trident, a colon after REG, and a far colon after FID. So, it is a Type 3 or an 1853:co.

Estimated Value: $50-70 (possibly more if it is the variety/error that I suspect). A hair ribbon variety sold on eBay for $516.25 in January of 2011.

1788 Conder Token Anglesey Mines Penny with Druid

This coin is in circulated but decent condition. I’d grade it F-12.

On the obverse, it shows the bust of a druid draped in a cowl and facing to the left. A wreath of oak leaves with acorns surrounds him, with a small opening at 12:00 and a bow at 6:00.

On the reverse, the coin shows the coat of arms for the Parys Mine Company (a monogram of the letters PMC). The legend reads “We Promise To Pay The Bearer One Penny” with the date inside the legend at 12:00.

Conder Token : 1788 Druid Penny Obverse

Conder Token : 1788 Druid Penny Obverse

Conder Token : 1788 Druid Penny Reverse

Conder Token : 1788 Druid Penny Reverse

Identification code: D&H Anglesey No:

Date: 1788

Mint Mark: n/a

Mintage: unknown (but fairly large)

Country of origin: England

Composition: Copper

Size: 34 mm

Weight: unknown

Other details: Conder tokens are also known as 18th Century Provincial Tokens in the United Kingdom, and are named after James Conder. Mr. Conder collected copper and bronze small denomination coins in the early 19th century when many of these circulated as advertising tokens for British firms. He published one of the first catalogs of these coins.

After his death, a hoard of Roman coins was found under James Conders door. There’s irony for you!

Conder Tokens circulated mostly in the countryside due to coin hoarding in the big cities. The British Royal Mint stopped minted copper coins in 1775, which caused major coin shortages in small towns and led to private minting. Regal coinage began again in 1797, and only a few Conder tokens were minted after that (either backdated or dateless).

This is one of the first Conder tokens I bought – I purchased it along with a 1791 halfpenny and a 1788 halfpenny.

Estimated Value: $10-20 in F12 condition.