Tag Archives: 1964

1964 Denmark 5 Kroner

This coin is in uncirculated condition but has a bit of contact wear / odd toning on the hair over the Princesses’ ear. That’s a high point, and a likely early indicator of any wear. I’d grade this between AU55 and MS61.

Denmark 1964 5 Kroner Obverse

Denmark 1964 5 Kroner Obverse

The obverse shows King Frederick IX of Denmark, facing to the right. The legend runs from 7:00 to 5:00 along the inside of the rim and reads “FREDERICK IX KONGE AF DANMARK” with artist’s initials at 6:00 on either side of a heart (?). The king is bareheaded, with a pronounced part visible on the right side of his head (towards the viewer).

Denmark 1964 5 Kroner Reverse

Denmark 1964 5 Kroner Reverse

On the reverse, Princess Anne Marie faces to the left with a pearl necklace just above the break in her bust. The legend runs clockwise from 7:00 to 5:00 and reads “PRINCESS ANNE-MARIES BRYLLUP 18*9*1964” with the denomination counterclockwise from 7:00 to 5:00 “5 Kroner”.

Identification code: KM-854

Date: 1964

Mint Mark: n/a

Mintage: 359,473

Country of origin: Denmark

Composition: 80% silver (20% copper?)

Size: 33mm

Weight: 17g (0.4372 oz ASW)

Other details: Princess Anne-Marie married Constantine II, the King of Greece who reigned from 1964 until the abolition of the Greek monarchy in 1973. Their reign was interrupted by the Colonel’s Coup in 1967, and he was exiled in 1967 after a failed counter-coup. After the junta fell, there was a plebiscite on 8 December 1974 which established the Third Hellenic Republic. Constantine, who was not allowed to return to Greece to campaign, accepted the results of the plebiscite and lived abroad until 2013. He was allowed only brief return visits before that (to attend funerals, open the Olympics, etc).

The couple has 5 children: Princess Alexia, born July 10th 1965 at Mon Repos, Corfu, Greece. Crown Prince Pavlos, born on May 20th 1967 at Tatoi Palace. Prince Nikolaos, born on October 1st 1969 in Rome. Princess Theodora, born on June 9th 1983 in London, who is pursuing an acting career. Prince Philippos, born on April 26th 1986 in London.

Estimated Value: $15 in MS with silver at ~$19/oz

90% Silver JFK Half Dollar Coin – 1964

This coin is in excellent shape, as are many of the first year JFK half dollars. Most saw little or no circulation and were kept as mementos or hoarded when the US moved away from silver coinage (by removing silver from dimes and quarters while reducing the fineness of half dollars from 0.900 to 0.400 in 1965). I would grade it in EF40 condition.

United States SIlver JFK 50 Cent Piece 1964 Obverse

United States SIlver JFK 50 Cent Piece 1964 Obverse

The obverse shows President John F. Kennedy in profile, facing to the left. The legend “Liberty” runs around the rim from 9:00 to 3:00. The date is written along the rim counter-clockwise from 7:00 to 4:00. And the motto “In God We Trust” is written horizontally from 7:30 to 3:30.

United States SIlver JFK 50 Cent Piece 1964 Reverse

United States SIlver JFK 50 Cent Piece 1964 Reverse

The reverse is dominated by the Presidential Seal – which had recently been redesigned for Pres. Kennedy. It shows an eagle holding an olive branch (peace) in its right claw and arrows (strength) in its left. During time of war, the symbols would be reversed (which does beg the question about why the pattern wasn’t changed in 2001). The thirteen stripes on the eagle’s chest represent the 13 original colonies. The horizontal bar across the top represents Congress forming one government from many. A banner above the eagle and between the eagle’s spread wings reads “E Pluribus Unum”. Fifty stars representing the fifty states encircle the eagle. The legend from 9:00 to 3:00 reads “United States of America” and the denomination, written from 8:00 to 4:00 reads “Half Dollar”.

Date: 1964

Mint Mark: n/a (Philadelphia)

Mintage: 277,254,766 (another 156,205,446 were minted with a Denver mint mark, so that Philadelphia accounted for 63.963% of the halfs produced in 1964). Here are mintage numbers for the entire series of JFK halfs.

Country of origin: The United States

Composition: 90% Silver, 10% Copper

Size: 30.6 mm / 2.15 mm thickness

Weight: 12.5 grams (0.36169 Troy oz ASW)

Varieties: The Accented Hair variety has sharply incised hair above Kennedy’s ear and is found only as a Proof. The Doubled Die obverse is available both as a circulation strike and as a Proof. The Doubled Die reverse is known only in Proof.

Other details: During his Thousand days in office, John F. Kennedy inspired millions of Americans – he was widely respected even by his political enemies. The Kennedy half dollar was first minted in 1964 and (as of 2012, when I am writing this), it is still being struck as the ‘circulating’ fifty cent piece of the United States. It was intended as a memorial to the assassinated President John F. Kennedy with a single year of mintage planned, but just like the Washington quarter (first struck for the bicentennial of his birth in 1932), it was so popular that the design replaced the older pattern.

The JFK half dollar was authorized by Congress just over a month after Jack Kennedy’s death. Use of existing designs by Mint sculptors Frank Gasparro and Gilroy Roberts allowed dies to be prepared quickly, and the first coins were struck in January of 1964.

Mint Director Eva Adams was a great admirer of Kennedy. She spearheaded the design of a commemorative coin for the fallen president. Gilroy Roberts wrote that Mint Director Adams had called him within hours of the assassination. He was at the Mint at the time, working, and they talked about the suitability of the Quarter Dollar, Half Dollar, and Silver Dollar. The Silver Dollar had not been produced in over 30 years, and while there were discussions going on about reviving the largest silver denomination (there were Peace dollars minted in 1964, but all were supposedly melted down without being released). The silver dollar was not seen as a viable option. First Lady Jackie Kennedy opposed replacing the Washington design of the quarter, and thus the half dollar denomination was chosen.

The previous design for the half dollar featuring Benjamin Franklin had been minted since 1948. By law, US circulating coinage designs must be used for a minimum of 25 years before new designs can replace them, but at the request of President Johnson, an exception was made in this case with congressional approval.

Shortly after the coin’s release, the Denver Mint began receiving complaints that the new coin was marked with a  hammer & sickle at the bottom of Kennedy’s neckline. In response, Roberts made public statements that the perceived Communist symbol was actually his monogram, a stylized “GR

The first year of issue was the only one where coin silver was used (planchets with a fineness of 0.900 or 90% silver). From 1965 to 1970, special planchets were used with a 40% fineness (the outer layers had a higher silver content, giving them a lighter/brighter finish than they would otherwise have). These 40% silver coins are often referred to as Silver Clad Half Dollars or SilverClad JFK Halfs.

In 1971, silver was eliminated entirely from the Kennedy 50 cent piece, although a few 1970 planchets are known to have slipped through in later years (primarily 1971).

A special design for the reverse of the half dollar was issued for the United States Bicentennial and was struck in 1975 and 1976. In addition to business strikes, special collector coins were struck for the Bicentennial in silver clad; silver proof sets in which the dime, quarter and half dollar were struck in 90% silver were first minted in 1992. Even though ample supplies of half dollars are now available, their circulation is extremely limited. Since 2002, Kennedy half dollars have only been struck to satisfy the demand from collectors, and are available through the Mint.

Estimated Value: $10.14 with silver at ~$38/oz

United States SIlver JFK 50 Cent Piece 1964 Obverse

United States SIlver JFK 50 Cent Piece 1964 Obverse

United States SIlver JFK 50 Cent Piece 1964 Reverse

United States SIlver JFK 50 Cent Piece 1964 Reverse

1964 Bermuda Crown Silver Coin

This coin is circulated condition; I would grade it a VF20.

The obverse shows Queen Elizabeth the 2nd from the shoulders up and facing right, wearing a fairly dainty looking crown. The legend reads (starting at 8:00): “Regina Elizabeth * II * Dei * Gratia”.

Bermuda 1 Crown 1964 Silver Coin Obverse

Bermuda 1 Crown 1964 Silver Coin Obverse

The reverse shows the Coat of Arms of Bermuda (without any of the heraldic colors, of course). A lion (symbol of England) is holding a shield emblazoned with a ship wrecking against an aft shore. The shipwreck shown is a historic one – it was the Sea Venture, the flagship of the Virginia Company. The ship carried the first settlers to the island when it was deliberately driven on to the reefs of Bermuda by Admiral Sir George Somers in 1609, to prevent it from foundering in a storm. All aboard survived, and the majority stayed to build the new settlement. The Latin motto under the coat of arms reads “Quo Fata Ferunt” (it means “Whither the Fates Carry [Us]”). The denomination is written from 8:00 to 4:00, it reads “One Bermuda Crown”. The date is split on either side of the coat of arms.

Bermuda 1 Crown 1964 Silver Coin Reverse

Bermuda 1 Crown 1964 Silver Coin Reverse

Identification code: Bermuda KM-14 (this pattern was only minted for one year, in 1964)

Date: 1964

Mint Mark: n/a (minted in the US by the Franklin Mint)

Mintage: 470,000 (plus an additional 30,000 proofs)

Country of origin: United States

Composition: 50% Silver (0.3636 oz ASW)

Size: 36 mm

Weight: 22.62g

Estimated Value: $16-20 with silver around $30/oz

1964 Proof Cent slabbed PF68 * RD

This penny is a proof, slabbed in an NGC holder. It has a beautiful red sheen and a highly reflective surface that captures the light, softens it, and then bounces it back like a sun on the horizon. It’s a penny, so maybe I’m getting a bit carried away there.

1968 US Penny PF68 Obverse

1964 US Penny PF68 Obverse

The obverse shows President Abraham Lincoln in profile to the right. The legend “In god we trust” is written in raised letters from 10:00 to 2:00. The motto “Liberty” is to the left of Lincoln, in line with the back of his neck and his beard. The date is to the right of Lincoln’s bowtie and the mint mark (when present) is under the date.

1968 US Penny PF68 Reverse

1964 US Penny PF68 Reverse

The reverse shows the Lincoln Memorial under the country of origin “United States of America” written from 6:00 to 3:00 The legend “E Pluribus Unum” is written above the monument but below the inscription (that is Latin for “Out of many, one”). The denomination “One Cent” is written from 8:00 to 4:00.

Date: 1964

Mint Mark: n/a (Philadelphia)

Mintage: 03,950,762 (0.1489% of the 2,652,525,762 minted that year)

Country of origin: United States

Composition: 95% copper, 5% tin & zinc

Size: 19 mm

Weight: 3.11 grams (0.1097 oz)

Other details: Due to hoarding issues caused by the switch from silver to clad coinage, the minting of proof pennies was suspended from 1965 to 1967.

Slabbed 1968 Proof Cent in PF68

Slabbed 1968 Proof Cent in PF68

Slabbed 1968 Proof Cent in PF68 Reverse

Slabbed 1968 Proof Cent in PF68 Reverse

Estimated Value: $1-2 (although the slabbing does add another $4 or more, IMO)