Category Archives: Elongates

Longines Silver Medal – T.A. Edison Light Bulb

This sterling silver medal is from the Longines Symphonette Historical Events Medal Series. It shows Thomas Edison’s laboratory in Menlo Park. Edison’s invention of the light bulb was a world changing event, and it’s amazing to think about all of the different components he had to envision, design, and implement to make it work. Did you know that the first light bulb filaments were made out of treated bamboo? That was one of the thousands of different materials he experimented with.

Longines Medal - T.A. Edison Light Bulb Obverse

Longines Medal - T.A. Edison Light Bulb Obverse

The reverse is covered in boring font, apparently written in loud, all-capital letters. The inscription reads “In addition to the electric lamp the unique genius of Thomas Alva Edison bequeathed to mankind the electric railroad, the phonograph, motion pictures, and many other marvelous inventions.” Below that, there’s a dyspeptic eagle at 6:00 on the medal.

Longines Medal - T.A. Edison Light Bulb Reverse

Longines Medal - T.A. Edison Light Bulb Reverse

Identification code: unknown

Date: 1972

Mint Mark: n/a

Mintage: 5,000 (this one is from set P #4,224, which is stamped on the edge)

Country of origin: United States of America

Composition: Sterling Silver (92.5% silver)

Size: 39 mm – it is slightly larger than a Morgan silver dollar, but this is not a coin.

Weight: 34 grams (1.109 ounces of ASW)

Other details: Longines is a watchmaker that sponsored a classical orchestra radio show in the 1940s called the Longines Symphonette. There were several different collections of silver medals made in the 1970’s to cross-promote the radio show and the Longines watch brand – this collection was produced along with Wittnauer Precious Metals Guild.

This medal comes from the Great American Triumphs series of 60 medals. These were sold in complete sets, or in little red boxes that held two medals each. The boxes were labeled “The Wittnauer Precious Metal Guild / Symphonette Square, Larchmont, N.Y. 10538 / Makers of Fine Medallic Art”.

These medals were produced in 92.5% silver and 99.99% silver. The edge of each medal is labeled with the composition (inscribed after “Longines Symphonette”). This one is labeled “Sterling”.

I recently purchased 48 of these medals, but have compiled a list of the full set with links to the medals that I own:

1775: Battle of Concord Bridge

(1775 – no date): Patrick Henry: “Give Me Liberty, or Give Me Death” Speech

1775: Paul Revere’s Midnight Ride

1775: Founding Of Boonesborough, Kentucky

1776: Declaration Of Independence

1776: Betsy Ross

1783: Washington’s Farewell

1785-1851: James Audubon

1779: John Paul Jones – I Have Not Yet Begun To Fight

1794: Eli Whitney And His Cotton Gin

1803: Lewis & Clark Expedition

1807: Fulton’s Folly

1811-1825: Overland Trail (one that I do not have)

1812: Old Ironsides

1814: Star Spangled Banner Francis Scott Key

1815: Battle Of New Orleans

1819-1892: Walt Whitman (one that I do not have)

1835-1910: Mark Twain

1836: The Alamo

1836: Samuel B. Morse, Telegraph

1846: Fifty-Four Forty or Fight (one that I do not have)

1847: Brigham Young

1848: Gold At Sutter’s Mill

1851: Clipper Ship Flying Cloud

1851: “Go West, Young Man” (one that I do not have)

1860: Pony Express

(undated: 1961-1909): Frederic Remington (one that I do not have)

1862: Robert E. Lee

1863: Gettysburg Address

1863: The Flight of the Nez Perce (one that I do not have)

1869: Transcontinental Railroad

1872: National Parks Yellowstone

1876: Telephone – AG Bell

1876: Little Big Horn (one that I do not have – and, well, I guess it was a ‘Great American Triumph’ for the Native Americans)

1879-1935: Will Rogers

1879-1955: Albert Einstein (one that I do not have)

1886: Statue Of Liberty

1886: Samuel Gompers – AFL

1895-1948: Babe Ruth

1895-1972: J. Edgar Hoover (one that I do not have)

1898: Battle Of San Juan Hill

1898-1937: George Gershwin

1898-1961: Ernest Hemingway (one that I do not have)

(undated: 1899): Log Float (one that I do not have)

1901: Walter Reed

1909: Model T Ford

1903: The First Flight

1904: Panama Canal

1909: Perry Finds North Pole

1918: The Doughboys

1920: Women’s Suffrage

1927: Lindbergh Flies the Atlantic (one that I do not have)

1929-1968: Reverend Martin Luther King (one that I do not have)

1931-1933: The Macon & Akron

1933: Inauguration Of President Roosevelt

1935: Flight of the China Clipper Seaplane

1941: Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms

1945: V.J. Day (one that I do not have)

1954: Salk Polio Vaccine

1959: Dawn Of The Jet Age

1961: Kennedy’s Inauguration (one that I do not have)

1909: Purchase Of Alaska

1976: 2 Centuries of Liberty, Peace, and Progress (one that I do not have)

Estimated Value: Approximately $45-55 with silver at $42/ounce

Elongate from Key West Ripleys Believe It Or Not Museum

This elongated nickel is from the Ripley’s Believe It Or Not Museum in Key West, Florida.

On the obverse, it shows a Padaung woman with rings stretching her neck. Kinda ironic, on an elongated coin, right? Robert Riple’ys signature is at the 12:00 on the tip of the long side of the coin. The bottom of the coin says “Key West”.

Elongated Nickel from Ripleys Believe It Or Not Key West Museum Obverse

Elongated Nickel from Ripleys Believe It Or Not Key West Museum Obverse

The reverse is plain, with very little trace of the original coin (a nickel or a quarter).

Elongated Nickel from Ripleys Believe It Or Not Key West Museum Reverse

Elongated Nickel from Ripleys Believe It Or Not Key West Museum Reverse

Source: A penny pressing machine at the Key West Odditorium.

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: Jefferson nickel (circa 2000)

Other details: The long-necked Paduang women are famed for their giraffe necks. They achieve this effect by putting bronze rings around their necks at a young age and gradually adding more to stretch out their necks. Unfortunately, they can’t take the rings off because their necks are too weak to support the weight of their heads.

The tradition is dying off because young Padaung women don’t want to be treated like tourist attractions.

Estimated Value: $0.55

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die in a rolling mill. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. The rolling mills often have designs on just one side, although 2 sided designs are fairly common. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Playing Cards in Las Vegas).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity.

http://www.irrawaddy.org/article.php?art_id=14378

San Antonio Riverwalk Elongated Penny

This elongated penny shows a pathway over the San Antonio River with a tour boat chugging along underneath. It is pressed onto a penny, and the design takes up about 75% of the surface.

Elongated Penny with San Antonio Riverwalk on the Obverse

Elongated Penny with San Antonio Riverwalk on the Obverse

Elongated Penny with San Antonio Riverwalk Reverse

Elongated Penny with San Antonio Riverwalk Reverse

Source: A penny press machine along the San Antonio riverwalk in Texas c. 2006. The River Walk is a touristy area with lots of TexMex restaurants, ice cream shops, and bars.

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: post 1982 Lincoln cent

Other details: This elongate is on a post 1982 penny, which means that it has a high zinc content. Crushing the Lincoln cent exposed the zinc, which has lead to some minor corrosion.

Estimated Value: $0.51

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die in a rolling mill. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. The rolling mills often have designs on just one side, although 2 sided designs are fairly common. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Playing Cards in Las Vegas).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity.

Elongated Penny from Ocracoke, North Carolina

This double-sided elongated penny is a bit of an overachiever. The patterns cover virtually all of the space on both sides.

On the obverse, there’s a portrait of the pirate Blackbeard next to a skull and crossbones flag. The legend around the rim reads “Blackbeard Exhibit * Ocracoke Island, NC”. On the right side of the portrait is the note “Teach’s Hole”. Don’t have a dirty mind – this was the name for the  sheltered bay on the island. It’s now known as Silverlake.

On the reverse, this elongate has the postscript “Blackbeard was killed near Teach’s Hole at Ocracoke Island, NC * Nov. 22 1718”.

Elongate from Ocracoke, North Carolina at the Blackbeard Exhibit Obverse

Elongate from Ocracoke, North Carolina at the Blackbeard Exhibit Obverse

Elongate from Ocracoke, North Carolina at the Blackbeard Exhibit Reverse

Elongate from Ocracoke, North Carolina at the Blackbeard Exhibit Reverse

Source: The Blackbeard’s Treasure Trove gift shop in Ocracoke, North Carolina. I worked for the Park Service in the fall of 2005 and lived in Ocracoke while working at the Cape Hatteras National Seashore.

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: post 1982 Lincoln cent

Other details: This elongate is on a post 1982 penny, which means that it has a high zinc content. Crushing the Lincoln cent exposed the zinc, which has lead to some minor corrosion.

Estimated Value: $0.51

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die in a rolling mill. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. The rolling mills often have designs on just one side, although 2 sided designs are fairly common. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Playing Cards in Las Vegas).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity.

Elongated Penny with Navy Pier in Chicago

This elongated penny is well centered and has an unusual round logo within the crenulated border.

On the obverse is a representation of the Navy Pier building in Chicago, Illinois, surrounded by a circular border. The border looks a little bit like a life buoy (aka a life ring or round float) and encloses the legend “Navy Pier * Chicago”.

Elongated Penny from the Chicago Navy Pier Obverse

Elongated Penny from the Chicago Navy Pier Obverse

Elongated Penny from the Chicago Navy Pier Reverse

Elongated Penny from the Chicago Navy Pier Reverse

Source: Chicago, Illinois, at the Navy Pier in the spring of 2008.

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: Lincoln cent (date and composition unknown)

Other details: I picked this up while in Chicago to take the State Department Written Exam for Foreign Service Officers. They only had the test in Washington DC, Chicago, Seattle, Atlanta, Boston, LA, and New York City that year (if memory serves) and did not pay travel expenses. I guess they didn’t want anyone from the American Southwest applying.

Estimated Value: $0.51

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die in a rolling mill. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. The rolling mills often have designs on just one side, although 2 sided designs are fairly common. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Playing Cards in Las Vegas).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity.

Elongate with Boston Skyline on a Lincoln Penny

This elongate from Boston is in pretty good shape, although it looks like the die didn’t fit (the left is perfectly aligned and the pattern still runs off of the coin to the right).

On the obverse, there’s a Boston skyline with waves in the foreground. The “B” in “Boston” is cursive, while the rest of the word is in sans serif font (looks like it could be balloon).

The elongate is uniface, but the reverse shows the Lincoln Memorial quite clearly.

Elongate Penny with Boston Skyline Obverse

Elongate Penny with Boston Skyline Obverse

Elongate Penny with Boston Skyline Reverse

Elongate Penny with Boston Skyline Reverse

Source: Boston, Massachusetts. I’m not sure where I got this – it was probably on a debate trip to Harvard college in 1999.

Status of the Machine: Still in operation (as far as I know)

Host Coin: post 1982 Lincoln cent

Other details: This elongate is on a penny minted after 1982, which means that it has a high zinc content. Crushing the Lincoln cent exposed the zinc, so its surprising that this coin doesn’t have any corrosion.

Estimated Value: $0.51

What are elongated coins?

This souvenir piece was made by crushing a coin against a die in a rolling mill. High pressure causes the host coin to deform and take on the shape of the die, although some details often remain. The rolling mills often have designs on just one side, although 2 sided designs are fairly common. These pieces have various names – they are known as elongates, pressed coins, squashed pennies, or flattened coins, elongated cents, or stretched coins.

The first elongates were made at the 1892 World’s Fair in Chicago. Since then, coin pressing machines have appeared at many locations all around the world. They are commonly found at tourist attractions and feature patterns evocative of a location or activity (ie; the Seattle Space Needle or Playing Cards in Las Vegas).

Coin pressing machines come in various designs. Many are powered by a hand crank, although there are also automatic machines with electric motors that can get pretty fancy. Most cost 51 cents to operate (including the price of the penny that’s being pressed).

Pennies, Dimes, Nickels, Quarters, and various foreign coins have been used as hosts through the years. Pennies are probably the most common, but it seems like quarters are rising in popularity.